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View Full Version : DXM News: "Governor calls for tougher drug laws...


rfgdxm
02-26-2005, 01:32 AM
If you watch the video, on the screen shot of Google search for "DXM", the listing for my site is clearly visible on screen. Hits from Florida should be up at the moment.

http://www.abc-7.com/articles/readnews.asp...eid=2692&z=2&p= (http://www.abc-7.com/articles/readnews.asp?articleid=2692&z=2&p=)

Governor calls for tougher drug laws for websites
Reported by Bay Scroggins

CAPE CORAL The deaths of two Cape Coral teenagers have the governor
calling for new drug laws. Nineteen year olds Steve Wambolt and Chris
Hundley may have died of a drug overdose after friends say they took
the raw, powder form of dextromethorphan purchased off the internet.

Alex Kulwicki, the teen who survived the overdose, confirmed he
purchased a drug from (deleted). The company runs a website selling
legal drugs meant for lab use, not human consumption.

Thursday the site stopped taking new orders, citing recent events, but
didn't specify whether the deaths of Steve Wambolt and Chris Hundley
played a role in the decision.

ABC7 has attempted to contact the site via e-mail and by phone, but
have received no response.

Friday, Governor Jeb Bush said he believes the deaths will trigger
tougher laws against drug websites.

"I hope the net result of this will be we are given the power to
tighten the noose on these kinds of horrific operations," said Bush.

Attorney General Charlie Crist agrees with the governor - and says
legislation could come soon.

"We have a session that starts in a couple of weeks, I'm sure that
some of our members from the house and senate would look at some
legislation that would directly impact and hopefully cure this kind of
problem from happening again," said Crist.

Senator Bill Nelson says he will meet with drug enforcement officials
next week.

The Cape Coral Police Department will not confirm or deny whether
(deleted) is part of their death investigation at this time.

libel
02-26-2005, 03:54 AM
Looks like its going to get bad for everyone..

squidman
02-26-2005, 04:04 AM
Nice job with the ranking on Google, I hope that these fellas crack down on Coriciden primarily. I think other, safer forms of dxm will be avaiable for quite some time.

Eloivore
02-26-2005, 04:39 AM
Thankfully, there's this little thingie I hear they call the First Amendment ... and pro-bono ACLU lawyers don't hurt either, if you can get them. Fear not; I suspect DV is pretty low on the hierarchy, somewhere below The Hive and above Bonsai Kitten.

libel
02-26-2005, 04:42 AM
hahahhaa <3 bwhite

n__u
02-26-2005, 01:08 PM
Leave it to a Bush to spoil everyone's fun....


Oh yeah, and those other guys.

Rexedgeltoe
02-26-2005, 06:52 PM
so, who's all gonna start their own lab when the legal websites go bust?

Eloivore
02-26-2005, 07:09 PM
Those who have the experience, equipment, and precursor resources necessary to synthesize DXM, and are inclined to break the law, might find other products more profitable and/or more interesting.

rfgdxm
02-27-2005, 02:08 PM
Originally posted by [email protected] 26 2005, 04:39 AM
Thankfully, there's this little thingie I hear they call the First Amendment ... and pro-bono ACLU lawyers don't hurt either, if you can get them. Fear not; I suspect DV is pretty low on the hierarchy, somewhere below The Hive and above Bonsai Kitten.
The DV might have problems finding anyone at the ACLU who would want to touch the case. If they ever go after my sites, my plan is to try and get big money news corporations to provide free counsel. Of course these corporations couldn't give a rat's ass about what is on my sites. However, I'd think if the government because they didn't like what was on my sites were to win People v. Golaszewski, wouldn't big money news outlets consider this a threatening precedent? What if based on this precedent the government used this to go after something the government didn't like that was published in the New York Times? (For those unaware, the New York Times has a major web presence at http://www.nytimes.com/. The home page has a Google Pagerank of 8. Any precedent that threatened freedom of the press on the WWW would be a money issue for the NYT.) It is quite possible that the NYT would provide me legal assistance at the federal district court level to get the case quickly dismissed rather that setting a bad precedent.

Given that the US government is targeting websites about drugs, I probably should seek someone outside of the US to take control of my sites if things get bad in the US. I already have handed off all the passwords to my domain names and web host to someone I trust that could keep my sites going if I should suddenly die. However, this person is in the US like me. I need someone in a country that believes in freedom of the press that could take over if things get bad in the US. Domain names are legal property, and ownership is transferable. Ownership of the files on my sites is also transferable. There is nothing the US government could do against websites outside of the US short of cutting the US off from the rest of the world on the Internet. I doubt it would be politically tolerable to block all access to European websites from the US.

As for the Hive, as I believe the DEA runs that site, it is unthreatened.

drdĒv€
02-27-2005, 02:34 PM
Originally posted by [email protected] 27 2005, 01:08 PM
As for the Hive, as I believe the DEA runs that site, it is unthreatened.
from another entheo based site

There's much lament on usenet that the hive and rhodium have disappeared and have been unreachable for quite some time now. Here is an interesting explanation from one poster, brian:

They're not coming back. The federal program initiated from within the
DEA has lost funding for this somewhat contoversial program. It was
designed to keep internet drugs manufacturing information in one place
so as to monitor and control it as much as possible. Some people felt
that they were allowing too much information to be passed along to
users who's IP's couldn't be traced.